rainier

Celebrating 100 Years of National Parks

Lenticular Clouds Over Mount RainierThe National Park Service turns 100 years old in 2016 and wants everyone to celebrate. All national parks, including Mount Rainier National Park, will waive entrance fees on 16 special days in 2016.

The remaining entrance-fee-free days for 2016 will be:

August 25-28 — National Park Service Birthday Weekend

September 24 — National Public Lands Day

November 11 – Veterans Day

“The NPS Centennial celebrates the nation’s incredible system of parks that have been established over the past 100 years, and contemplates the need to engage current and future generations in their stewardship. Fee free days support these goals by encouraging people to visit, explore, enjoy, and ultimately care for their parks. We look forward to welcoming all visitors to Mount Rainier in 2016!” stated Superintendent Ruby King.

Sitting at 5,658 feet above sea level, High Rock fire lookout has unmatched 360 degree views of all the peaks in the Southern Cascade range, from Mount Rainier (pictured), to Mount Adams, Mount St. Helens, and even Mount Hood on clear days. The relatively short distance hike to High Rock (3.5 mile round trip), not far from Ashford, is a thigh burner. Gaining 1,400 feet in elevation in just under 2 miles, the trail leaves hikers gasping for oxygen, and second guessing the climb, but views at the top make all that sweat worth it.

Sitting at 5,658 feet above sea level, High Rock fire lookout has unmatched 360 degree views of all the peaks in the Southern Cascade range, from Mount Rainier (pictured), to Mount Adams, Mount St. Helens, and even Mount Hood on clear days. The relatively short distance hike to High Rock (3.5 mile round trip), not far from Ashford, is a thigh burner. Gaining 1,400 feet in elevation in just under 2 miles, the trail leaves hikers gasping for oxygen, and second guessing the climb, but views at the top make all that sweat worth it.

Whether you seek an exhilarating hike through the wilderness, or prefer relaxed strolls through a meadow of wildflowers, there are plenty of ways to enjoy some of the wide range of national park experiences that Mount Rainier has been providing since 1899.

Centennial activities and events will be posted online to the park’s calendar throughout 2016. Keep updated on park happenings, discover things to do, and learn more about the park’s many resources by visiting www.nps.gov/mora.

Mount Rainier’s current entrance fee is $20 per vehicle for a seven-day access pass. This fee will be raised to $25 on May 27, 2016.

The park’s annual pass is twice the cost of a seven day pass and provides an entire year of unlimited visits. Entrance and camping fees are used to maintain facilities and provide services that directly benefit visitors, and are a critical source of funding at Mount Rainier and other parks.

The entrance waiver on fee-free days does not cover the costs of camping site fees, Special Use Permits, or Climbing Passes. Mount Rainier also offers park annual passes for $40, which provides an entire year of park access to the pass holder. Other available passes also cover entrance fees at national parks and other federal recreational lands throughout the country.

Find more information about the range of options at www.nps.gov/findapark/passes.htm, or pick up a pass of your own at the park’s entrance booths.

Source: visitrainier.com

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